A Dancer Dies Twice®

 

There's been a lot of interest in who was the 'First to Use' the saying 'a dancer dies twice'

Believe this or not, but I was the first to use the saying 'a dancer dies twice' for a manuscript I was already writing, & had the idea to call it 'A Dancer Dies Twice' in 2015.

AND THIS IS HOW IT ALL STARTED.

 

 

In 2015 I was looking for an 'unused' title for a book & film idea.

It was a Sunday afternoon when I came across a newspaper article in 2015 about ballet dancers in the 'Telegraph', & my imagination sparked a brilliant idea for a book title.

And, NO....the 'Telegraph' was not using 'A Dancer Dies Twice' as a headline in that article.

I talk about this in my 'Legal Notice' page also.

 

Here, read it:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/dance/11647195/truth-about-ballet-dancers.html

The last paragraph last sentence says, there is a saying in the ballet industry, 'a dancer dies twice'

I had a lightbulb moment!

My first instinct was to search Google, Amazon, the entire world web because I didn't want to copy someone else's idea. I wanted a fresh new title never used before. I wanted to be original. I wanted to be a respected author with imagination, not a writer who copies another author's book title.

 

I found a gap in the market!

 

No one was using the unknown saying 'a dancer dies twice' in any format whatsoever, & I do mean no one, not even in any online articles.

 

There was no magazine article using 'A Dancer Dies Twice' as a headline in 2015, & all my Google searches came up 'empty spaces' of 'no searches found' for 'A Dancer Dies Twice'

It was an unused title!

THIS IS THE TRUTH, THE WHOLE TRUTH, AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH!

 

And this is how my book title 'A Dancer Dies Twice' was founded for my book idea in 2015.

In 2016 I decided to register my book title with an online Copyright company, but I later discovered by copyright solicitors, this wasn't necessary as Copyright is automatic, as the 'Bernie Convention Copyright' for literary work & authors, published & unpublished, an international agreement, governing copyright, protects an author's creative work, including the creative idea.

In 2016 I submitted my manuscript to literary agents & publishers like Madeleine Milburn Literary, TV & Film Agency & Curtis Brown Creative Ltd, & many more for feedback using the title on my manuscript 'A Dancer Dies Twice'

The evidence of those submissions, I still have today.

Between the years of 2015 - 2017, I carefully monitored Google searches for any new links relating to

'A Dancer Dies Twice' because of my interest in the title, but again, Google still had 'no searches' for

'A Dancer Dies Twice'. 

In 2017 I decided to open my author's website using the domain name 'A Dancer Dies Twice'

It was at this stage, I started to notice individuals copying ideas from my website, using my book title idea.

At first, it started with film students copying my book title, character ideas, storyline ideas from video blogs on my website, but I since removed those video blogs to keep my storyline a secret.

After consulting copyright solicitors, the idea came about to Trademark my book title as I was writing a series of books called 'A Dancer Dies Twice'

The IPO (Intellectual Property Office) do a thorough investigation to find out if the title I was using

'A Dancer Dies Twice' was unique enough to be registered as a Trademark by searching the world web for any similar online use of the title for any written work, published or unpublished.

The IPO, including my Trademark Solicitor, found no published or unpublished work using the title

'A Dancer Dies Twice' on the internet.

Yes, that's right, the IPO & my solicitors, found NO online articles for 'A Dancer Dies Twice'

The IPO (Intellectual Property Office), including Solicitors, have a legal obligation to be completely transparent with their investigations.

My solicitors & the IPO, only found the BBC  Radio 4 using 'A Dancer Dies Twice' for a radio documentary dated 2017, but my manuscript 'A Dancer Dies Twice' backdated to 2015, 2 years prior to the BBC Radio 4, with evidence that the manuscript was submitted to publishers in 2016, & I could prove to them that the idea was mine first.

 

There is also a period where anyone has the opportunity to oppose a trademark before it is legally registered with the IPO.

No one opposed the application & it was registered without any conflicting challenges from anyone, either in the UK or abroad.

I first heard of 'Martha Graham' (1894 -1991) two years after I started writing my manuscript in 2017, & learned that the saying 'a dancer dies twice' was a saying by a modern American dancer, called 'Martha Graham'

I had no idea who Martha Graham was in 2015, as the newspaper article in the Telegraph made no references to the dancer, only that the saying came from the ballet industry.

I do not make claims I was the first to say 'a dancer dies twice', if in fact, 'Martha Graham' was the first.

The saying in 2015 was an unknown, unused saying, I was just the first writer to use the saying for a series of fiction books, there wasn't even any non-fiction books published by a ballet dancer for a biography using the saying 'a dancer dies twice' as a title.

I WAS THE FIRST.

That is my ONLY claim.

Prior to my 'First to Use' no one was using the saying for commercial purposes or otherwise.

In all honesty, I had no idea that my book title & website would create so much interest. I honestly thought that no one would be interested in anything I was doing, writing, or creating.

 

My ONLY regret is that I wished I hadn't announced the title of my book ahead of publication as this exposed me to jealous rivalry, & competition.

Not my wisest move as a writer in hindsight, but I never imagined in my wildest dreams, that anyone would be interested in anything I was doing.

Let this be a lesson to all you new writers out there!

If you create a new idea for a book, keep it a secret (including your title) until you are ready for publication.

I'm not actually doing anything wrong, morally or otherwise, & if the saying 'a dancer dies twice' was so important to so many others out there, why wait to use it until only AFTER I started to use it for a fiction book?

 

Since I first created my website, 'a dancer dies twice' has become a 'popular topic of conversation' in newspaper & magazine articles. I don't really mind as the articles are about dance & the Ballet. What I object to is that those articles changed their 'original titles' to include 'A Dancer Dies Twice' in the headline after its original publication date.

 

Not very honest is it?

 

The others were film students, graphic students, fan-fiction writers, the musings of a ballet dancer, the BBC radio, I've inspired YouTube, writers using 'similar' sounding titles & so many other's using 'A Dancer Dies Twice' to market & advertise a project or business enterprise, all using my book title

'A Dancer Dies Twice'

SO HOW SHOULD I FEEL ABOUT THIS?

HOW WOULD YOU FEEL ABOUT THIS AS A WRITER IF HAPPENED TO YOU?

WOULD YOU STAY QUIET?

WOULD YOU FEEL THE NEED TO SPEAK UP AND SAY SOMETHING?

To those who did copy my ideas, I have this to say:

"Your creative imagination is only as good as the one's you copy, so don't be known as a copycat, be original, I would never copy anyone, I'm too honest, I respect copyright laws & trademark laws, where is your respect for me & if someone copied your ideas, how would you feel?"

I'm in the firing line now, I hear you say, but you know what, I would rather go down fighting on a battle-field, as brave as a lion, than cower away living a thousand days afraid of the bullies.

One solicitor called this 'coat-tailing' its a saying used when people start to jump onto the coat-tails of someone else's creative idea, when someone else's ideas starts 'a popular trend', people start to jump onto the coat-tail to increase their own 'fan-based' followers, but without the same hard work & effort of the original creative writer, who came up with the idea first.

For example, if everyone is so intrigued with the ballet & in Martha Graham, then why don't they give credit to the ballet & Martha Graham, by using the headlines:

'The Great Martha Graham' or 'The Great Ballet'

But you know, it's not the title that makes a book a best-seller, its the story & what my readers think.....not my competition.

I might actually be the most popular flop in history.......& then you can all laugh at me & call me names, say I didn't get to be the best-selling author of all times.

But at least I tried......some people never try.......they just dream about it.......but you see.....I'm not a dreamer!

Back to my books, over the last 5 years, my life has been busy & hectic. Some things are too personal to explain here, and I'm in a whirlwind of ever changing chapters in my life, but I'm still working on getting my books published very soon.

 

So, watch this space.......!

I never started this writing journey for fame, it wasn't even for money, it was a desire to tell a story about a ballet dancer & her story of blind jealousy, overwhelming grief, PTSD, & bullying.

Most people respect Trademark® & Copyright© laws but some individuals don't & this statement was written for those very people.

Those that do, I thank you, I love you, & I wish you every success!

Rosanna x

©2015 by A Dancer Dies Twice®© - ADDT Films©

Protected by Registered Trademark® & Copyright laws©

https://trademarks.ipo.gov.uk/ipo-tmcase/page/Results/1/UK00003317903